2005 Morgan Roadster V6 (1/20/2017)

The Morgan Roadster was introduced in 2004 by the Morgan Motor Company and replaced the Morgan Plus 8.  The Roadster is identical to the Plus 8, however is mechanically modern due to a new Ford V6.  The newer Ford V6 developed similar power to the Plus 8, however less torque.  Due to the lighter weight of the Roadster, even though it was down on power, performance was increased.  The chassis consists of a “ladder” frame design and is built from galvanized steel.  The body is built of steel and aluminum around an ash frame.  The suspension is the traditional Morgan “slider-type” in the front, with a solid axle and lead springs in the rear.

In typical Morgan fashion, the interior of the Roadster is full of Smith Instruments, Moto-Lita Steering Wheel, rock hard seats, and floor-hinged pedals.  Combine all of these aspects of the Morgan Roadster and Morgan’s purpose is clear, a new engine in the same car.

20170119_145431      20170119_145500

2005 Morgan Roadster

 

1955 CITROEN TRACTION AVANT (12/28/2016)

The Citroën Traction Avant is an executive car produced by the French manufacturer Citroën from 1934 to 1957. About 760,000 units were produced. This car pioneered mass production of three revolutionary features that are still in use today: a unitary body with no separate frame, four-wheel independent suspension, and front-wheel drive.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citro%C3%ABn_Traction_Avant)

 

Morse Citroes PS compressed Morse Citroen DS compressed Morse rear compressed

 

CAR OF THE WEEK (7/22/2016)

1937 & 1936 FORD PICK UP TRUCK2 JEEP FOR WEB

The 1937 Ford featured a more rounded look with fine horizontal bars in the convex front and hood-side grilles. The front grille was V-shaped, rather than following the fenders into a pentagon shape, as on the 1936 model.

CAR OF THE WEEK (6/10/2016)

2 bentleys - 1 rolls WEBSITE

Car Of The Week (4/8/2016)

1931 Ford Model A

The Ford Model A (also colloquially called the A-Model Ford or the A, and A-bone among rodders and customizers),[2] was the second huge success for the Ford Motor Company, after its predecessor, the Model T. First produced on October 20, 1927, but not sold until December 2, it replaced the venerable Model T, which had been produced for 18 years. This new Model A (a previous model had used the name in 1903–04) was designated a 1928 model and was available in four standard colors.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Model_A_(1927%E2%80%9331)

 

Model A GSL Model A GSL W

 

1953 CHRYSLER SPECIAL COUPE – CAR OF THE WEEK (2/19/2016)

1953 CHRYSLER SPECIAL COUPE

 

This is a unique 1953 Chrysler “Thomas Special” coupe with coachwork by Ghia.  One of Chrysler’s first “Idea Cars” of the 1950s, the dazzling coupe was designed by Virgil Exner and crafted by famed Italian coachbuilder and stylist, Ghia. Only six of these vehicles were produced for Chrysler, while Ghia built another 12 examples for themselves.

http://www.carscoops.com/2010/07/1953-chrysler-special-coupe-fetches.html )

 

CHRYSLER GHIA CAR OF THE WEEK FBCAR OF THE WEEK CHRYSLER GHIA 2FB GHIA CHRYSLER CAR OF THE WEEK

1971 MERCEDES BENZ 280SE 3.5 – CAR OF THE WEEK (2/9/2016)

CAR OF THE WEEK PARKOFF MEBE 3.5 COMPRESSED

The Mercedes-Benz W111 was a chassis code given to a range of Mercedes’ vehicles produced between 1959 and 1971. There were only 1232 convertible cabriolet’s produced with a 3.5 engine

In August 1969, the 280 SE 3.5. The car was fitted with the brand-new M116 3499 cc V8 engine with 200 hp and a 0-100 at 9.5 seconds (11.5 for the auto). To accommodate the large engine, the car’s front grille was widened and front and rear bumpers were modified with the addition of rubber strips. The rear lenses changed to a flatter cleaner design. This change was carried across the standard 280 SE. Some view this car as an ideological successor to the W112 300 SE, though it lacked the air suspension of the W112. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercedes-Benz_W111)

1929 Plymouth Model U – Car Of The Week (1/8/2016)


The Car Of the Week is a 1929 Plymouth Model U.

The Plymouth automobile was introduced at Madison Square Garden on July 7, 1928.  It was Chrysler Corporation’s first entry in the low-priced field, which at the time was already dominated by Chevrolet and Ford.  Plymouths were actually priced slightly higher than their competition, but offered standard features such as internal expanding hydraulic brakes that the competition did not provide.  Plymouths were originally sold exclusively through Chrysler dealerships, offering a low-cost alternative to the upscale Chrysler-brand cars.  The logo featured a rear view of the ship Mayflower which landed at Plymouth Rock in Plymouth, Massachusetts.  However, the inspiration for the Plymouth brand name came from Plymouth binder twine, produced by Plymouth Cordage Company, also of Plymouth.  The name was chosen by Joe Frazer due to the popularity of the twine among farmers.

( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plymouth_%28automobile%29 )